Microadventure: Bath Skyline

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I’m lucky in that my job occasionally takes me around the country (and sometimes even abroad). So when I had a speaking engagement booked in Bristol it was obvious to see if I could squeeze in a #microadventure.

Bath microadventure

My adventure friend Emma is lucky enough to live in Bath (conveniently close to Bristol) and was kind enough to scout a few locations for us. By the time I arrived though, lady luck did initially look a bit against us. It was raining steadily and all the pubs were completely full due to the Bath vs Bristol Rugby match. After a swift half and a gastro pub dinner (we are classy microadventurers!) we were on our way climbing up the steep atmospheric streets of Bath.

Bath microadventure

I like to think that I’m not overly superstitious but when crossing a field our head torches caught what seemed like a thousand devil eyed creatures charging towards us. Don’t panic, it wasn’t devils, it was cows but they were definitely running our way which is worrying enough. I did my usual tactic when confronted by cows which is to stand my ground and wait for them to stop. They stopped. Big sigh of relief all round.

Bath microadventure

We made the skyline and were able to find a mostly convenient spot away from the path with some trees to rig a tarp. At least by now the rain had stopped and there were even a few stars about. As well as a shelter the (camouflaged) tarp also made us very tricky to spot. The night was cold but it was dry and I was warm enough in my sleeping bag plus a few more layers.

Bath microadventure

The morning was bitter cold but a warming cup of coffee and a bit of malt loaf did the trick of reviving us enough to get going.

16 campouts in 2016
Instead of just coffee I had been tempted to bring some booze as this was my 16th campout of the year and the target that I set myself in January. In just over a year I’ve gone from someone who had never slept outdoors without at least a tent to what feels like a microadventure veteran.

The question did arise as to what I should do next year – 17 challenges in 2017. Some early thoughts:

What was definitely a wonderful bit of luck was the amazing sunrise over a frosty field that welcomed our walk back into Bath. About five minutes after this it started raining. Every gorgeous sunrise just fills my heart with joy and makes it sing.

Bath microadventure

Bath microadventure

Bath microadventure

Bath microadventure

A fantastic night out to complete this challenge. I’m sure i’ll be doing more campouts but I’m sure I won’t be keeping score from now on.

A huge thanks to Emma who was such a great adventure companion!

Expedition: The Tour de Turret

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If you read my plan for this trip you’ll know that I was excited but also completely terrified. I have friends who have done much bigger things than a few days of cycling but i’m a believer of finding one’s own level of adventure. For me this is a huge thing (for now) but I hope that it will be another step towards bigger and more ambitious things in the future.

The Tour de Turret would (hopefully) take me 200(ish) miles from Nottingham, via twelve castles, to London. I reckoned on this taking four days with about 50 miles a day and bivvying out the nights in between. I had no exact plan on where I was going to stay, it was going to be ad-hoc microadventure/stealth camp style.

Things started with a bit more excitement than I’d wanted with realising a bit late that I wouldn’t be able to get the tube to St.Pancras (or even into central London) as it was still rush hour. I wanted to conserve my legs but ended up hammering it into town – let’s not start by missing my train!

Day 1 – Nottingham to Tamworth
Despite doing quite a bit of public speaking for my job, I feel very uncomfortable filming myself. Feel lucky that i’ve posted this!

Tour de Turret

Nottingham Castle didn’t actually have much ‘castle’ left after it was razed during the civil war and a previous house was burnt down. The gateway looked alright though! I really felt that if I was going to have any chance of completing this adventure then I needed to get my quota in today and that meant reaching at least Tamworth, 43 miles (70km) away which is on top of the 17km that I cycled to St. Pancras this morning. It was a tall order (but i’m taller).

Tour de Turret

The first leg of my journey took me through Nottingham and soon out into a bit of countryside. A feature of this trip is going to be canals and like many things in life, sometimes they are my friend and sometimes my enemy. Today though, canals were mostly my friend and Google maps (cycle) took me across or down a few so as to avoid roads.

Tour de Turret

Before long I’d arrived at Castle No.2 – Elvaston Castle. ‘But its a house’ I hear you cry! Yes it is, BUT it has castle in its name and look at the crenelations! Plus if you’re going to be picky about this one, there is worse to come I assure you. I, at least, was very happy to have stopped by here.

Tour de Turret

Feeling the pressure of time and the limited daylight hours I pressed on to my next target, the brilliantly named ‘Ashby de-la-Zouche Castle‘ (No.3). Another feature of this trip and another ‘sometimes my friend and sometimes my enemy’ is Google maps (cycle). On the whole it seems to be my friend on the open road but it gives me the right old run-around in any built up area. In Ashby it led me around three sides of the castle including a back alley instead of the short, direct route. I’ll leave further ranting about google maps for later!

Tour de Turret

After Ashby, I started to get a bit tired but promised myself a good meal in Tamworth. This section was mostly an internal argument about whether I wanted a curry or fish and chips or maybe a pizza. Plus where was I going to leave my bike where it wasn’t going to get nicked (I only brought a light flimsy lock).

Tour de Turret

Tour de Turret

I made it to Tamworth (and its castle) just after five’o’clock and in the end I had a superb curry and a beer and it went a long way towards re-energizing my batteries! By the time I was finished it was dark and I had the small matter of finding somewhere to bed down for the night. No formal campsites for me, I was out to stealth camp!

I had ear-marked some lakes south of Tamworth as having good potential for a bivvy out but getting to them was harder than it seemed. Firstly it was now dark and secondly good’ol google maps sent me down the canal which was narrow and muddy. I ended up walking my bike for at least 2-3 km. Finding a campout spot in the dark is always tricky but even more so when you need to hide a bike as well. Especially when the bike is covered in reflective stickers especially made to be seen in the dark.

After a bit of anguished searching I found what I thought was the perfect spot – a fisherman’s seat/place/hide [not sure what you call them] that was not obvious from the path and would give me a great view of the sunrise in the morning. I unpacked and bedded down for the night only to be woken about an hour later by a couple of guys (fishing wardens I think) who were apparently looking for poachers. Despite not having any means to catch fish (plus I WAS ASLEEP) they insisted that I move on to be on the safe side. For the record this is the first time I’ve ever been moved on! Apparently they caught the reflections of my bike from across the lake.

No one likes being woken up and I had the hassle of packing my gear and then finding somewhere else. About a mile away I found a place set in from the path and hidden by trees that looked ok. It was a lot damper here and as a wildlife bonus I was pooped on by (i think) a bird above me. It was pretty sizable and the thud on my bivvy bag actually woke me up.

Tour de Turret

Day 2 – Tamworth (kind of) to Broughton Castle

At least the night hadn’t been all that cold. That is about as positive as I can make it. The morning was all foggy and dark (no ace sunrise) and after brewing up some coffee and a small bowl of porridge I was actually grateful to be getting on my way.

Tour de Turret

Tour de Turret

My first castle of the day (No.5 overall) was the privately owned fortified mansion of Maxstoke. With the scary signs in the drive plus some actual people in the gatehouse lodge I didn’t go in. You can (just about) make out a tiny bit of the castle from at the end of the drive.

Tour de Turret

It was a grey, cold cycle and I was more than a bit grateful when I reached Meriden (it claims to be the centre of England) and more specifically a cafe where I was able to get a fry-up and a coffee. On this trip I always ensured that I had enough to eat in my panniers but also took every opportunity to get a proper meal (and get my waterbottles refilled). At the table next to mine was a fabulous couple of old guys having a chat. They seemed so happy and cheerful, even on such a grey morning. Cheered me up a bit too!

Tour de Turret

Back on the road, it wasn’t long before I got to castle no.6 the fabulous looking Kenilworth Castle. Unlike yesterday I actually had a lot more time today to actually look around if I wanted, however, when it came to it I preferred to get some miles clocked while I was still feeling good.

Tour de Turret

A short eight miles further down the road I was in the lovely town of Warwick with what might be one of the best castles on my trip (No. 7 Warwick Castle). I was slightly pre-prepared for the fact that the castle is now more of a theme park than an historical building and I can’t say I was very tempted to go in (not least because of the ‘premium’ cost). I settled instead for an old world looking teashop and a lovely cream tea.

Tour de Turret

Refreshed by coffee and clotted cream I was on my way again. Not far from Warwick I found myself in a suburb of Leamington Spa called Heathcote, which also happens to be my mum’s family name. Is this where my ancestors are from?

Tour de Turret

The countryside for the rest of the day was distinctly more undulating than i’d been used to so far and the hills started to take their toll a bit. At one point near the village of Avon Dassett I saw what looked like an iron age hill-top fort. Bonus ‘castle’ here I reckoned.

Tour de Turret

Although not a fort it did turn out to be excavations from mine workings and they are now a nice looking country park. From this point onwards I was looking out for potential campout sites. I felt that unlike the previous night I wanted to be settled before dark this time.

Tour de Turret

It was a gorgeous late afternoon and castle no. 8 – Broughton Castle (another fortified manor house) looked good in this light. After this my radar was set exclusively to ‘bivvy site’ and I spent an anxious 45 minutes looking for somewhere that was a) near my route, b) hidden from the road and any houses and c) would give me a good view of the sunrise.

Tour de Turret

I still enjoyed the sunset of course! I found a good place in a field, behind a hedgerow. Once dark I unpacked and got in my sleeping bag, even though it was only 1830. It got cold quite quickly but it didn’t matter as I was snug and reading my kindle. I think I was asleep by eight-thirty!

Day 3 – Broughton Castle to The Tower of London

Tour de Turret

Tour de Turret

After carefully ensuring that I would wake up facing east I was a tad disappointed to find it was grey and cold again. No sunrise for Jason [sad face emoticon].

Sunrise disappointment aside, I’d slept a lot better last night (I did have almost eleven hours). Usual coffee and porridge and I was away. With bivvying there is at least not a lot of faff in the mornings. After a short few miles I was in the twee village of Deddington where I was lucky to see a sign for ‘cafe’ and ‘coffee and breakfast inside’. I wandered into what turned out to be a posh Inn. The staff may have spotted something of the fact that I’d been wearing the same clothes for two days and nights and that i’d literally slept in a hedge. They put me well away from the other normal, I assume sweet smelling, guests. I didn’t care too much and just enjoyed my belgian waffle and bacon.

Tour de Turret

There was not a lot of suffering on the food front on this trip I can assure you! My time filling up on coffee and brekkie also gave the day time to perk up a bit and by the time I got to (Castle no.9) Deddington Castle there was even a bit of sun.

Tour de Turret

From the picture i imagine you’re thinking ‘sure, nice field but where is the castle?’. Well, it got knocked down ok and we only have the earth wall and ditch left. I did warn you earlier that it would get worse. I promise they get better from here on!

Tour de Turret

From here I had a pleasant morning cycling in the chill sunshine, the highlight being to briefly overtake a group of cyclists in lycra (and definitely no panniers). To be fair I think they were going slow waiting for someone to catch up. Or am I just really fast? It is the first one. I caught up on some provisions outside Bicester at a military base before reaching Castle no.10 Boarstall Tower.

Tour de Turret

I knew the tower was closed to visitors and in any case I wasn’t that worried about going in. I was just eating a snack outside, however, when a car comes up the drive and an incredibly posh woman winds down her window to tell me the place is closed. She sounded quite annoyed as folk apparently don’t read the sign and just knock on the door. It turns out that she lived there and its a house when it isn’t an English Heritage tourist trap. I told her about my trip and interest in castles and she softened considerably and said I was welcome to look round the gardens. I think she was on the cusp of inviting me in for tea when I said I had to leave.

Tour de Turret

Tour de Turret

Following a caffeine top-up in Thame I joined the wonderful Phoenix Trail (and old railway line) where I saw a deer (a mountjac), one of several I saw during the day. The end of this trail brought me to Princes Risborough and the Chilterns.

The thing is I’d vaguely planned to camp somewhere in the chilterns and end my day here. The problem was that it was only 3 o’clock and I was feeling pretty fresh. Well, whilst not quite ‘fresh’ I felt that I could carry on ok. Once past the hills I knew it would be tougher to find somewhere to bivvy so I felt I had to either stop or really go for broke.

Every now and again I want to see if I can really push it and this seemed a good time. Time to put the hammer down and just keep going.

I came unstuck almost immediately by a killer of a hill outside of High Wycombe. It defeated me in that I had to push my bike up most of it. Slough was tough in a different way in that google maps directed me down the major roads which were a nightmare. I never thought I’d be glad to see Eton.

Tour de Turret

Tour de Turret

It felt really amazing to get to Windsor Castle (a real proper castle!). I was a bit tired now but determined to finish. My initial thought was to get something to eat in Windsor but the place was rammed with tourists and it occurred to me that I should carry on while it was still light.

Crossing back over to Eton I did have a wee in the school sport grounds (out of sight I may add). It’s about as subversive a thing as I can imagine. From here I suffered a number of miles on the bumpy towpath of the Grand Union canal (curse you google maps). I did stop in Chiswick for a sourdough pizza and [cough] a small glass of wine.

Tour de Turret

The last miles were pretty tough as I had to have my ‘city cycling’ wits about me and I was pretty pooped. I was pretty damn chuffed with myself when the Tower of London finally rolled into view.

Tour de Turret

Tour de Turret

I think I might have clocked up 90-95 miles. Bloody hell that’s a lot! A decent four day cycle in three days! I treated myself to the train home from central London.

This definitely ranks as one of my proudest moments in a while. Beforehand I was incredibly nervous about doing the distance. I also did find it a bit stressful bivvying with the bike, something that I don’t think would have worried me if i’d been walking.

After my epic third day of cycling I was a total zombie and good for nothing the day after. It has made me think though, that if I’d stuck to the 50 miles a day I feel I could have carried that on for some time. Something similar or longer now feels quite doable and I’m already eyeing up ‘Tour de Turret 2’ amongst other projects.

It’s been emotional.

 

Tour de Turret – The plan

A couple of months ago I did a 2-day cycle (and campout) to Ditchling Beacon and back with the awesome Fiona Quinn. It was something that i’d not done before and the total of 110 miles felt like quite an achievement for me. But of course, when you break through one barrier, you need to line up the next one.

One bike, four days – where to go?
At the end of my two day trip I was very very tired and the prospect of doing another day on top seemed pretty daunting. So obviously I’ve set myself the goal of doing a four day cycle this time. It scares the hell out of me and there is a real jeopardy of not finishing. However, it is this very fear that will make  this trip worthwhile. Please let this statement be true!

With my current levels of bike fitness (just infrequent commuting into town) I didn’t want to push my mileage too much. I figure, therefore, that 50 miles a day is challenging but doable. The next question is where to go to and from? I very much like the idea of cycling home so if London is the destination where is 200 miles away? My answer is Nottingham!

A Theme?
Very much inspired by the wonderful adventure themes of Helen Proudfoot (Ham sandwich, Wellington Boot and Sauce to sauce) I was keen to do or visit something memorable. I am quite happy to be gimmicky!

I like a bit of history and in particular I quite like to visit castles. Call it a weakness if you like. So if I started in Nottingham, how many castles can I visit on the way? The answer is less than I imagined (most castles are in ‘trouble’ border areas or the coast). If I dodge about the midlands and squeeze in Windsor it looks like I can get in eleven castles. It also helps if I extend my definition to include folly’s, fakes, towers, fortified farms and in Nottingham’s case just being on the site of an iconic castle. The goal is therefore:

Nottingham Castle
Elvaston Castle
Ashby de la Zouche Castle
Tamworth Castle
Maxstoke Castle
Kenilworth Castle
Warwick Castle
Broughton Castle
Boarstall Tower
Windsor castle
Tower of London

I wanted a cool name to go with this trip (obvs). My ideas included ‘Battlement bike-ride’ and ‘Crenelation cycle’. It took the wonderful Helen to come up with ‘Tour de Turret’ which I think we can all agree is the winner!

I’ve booked a train up to Nottingham and given myself four clear days to cycle back to London. It’s now or never. Here goes.

tower-of-london-aerial-view-132125153

Walking across Greater London – Part 3

Nearly 5 years ago (in 2011) I started a project to walk across the whole of Greater London, east to west. Even I am not quite sure why I didn’t finish this before now?? Here we go…

The Project

Very simply, this is an attempt to walk across the whole of Greater London, east to west, at it’s widest points. I reckoned that this would take 3 days with each leg being approximately 13-20 miles. In Part 1 I walked from the farmlands of the eastern edge of the London Borough of Havering to Barking. In Part 2 I went from Barking to Queensway (at the  west end of Hyde Park).

This is the third, and final, part where I walk all the way to the furthest reaches of the London Borough of Hillingdon.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Notting Hill and Kensington
So here I was, five years after i’d ended the last section of the walk. I’d got here early and immediately worried that I’d made a mistake. I hadn’t even thought about it but this was the day of the Notting Hill Carnival. Barriers were up and the police were already in force. I moved to exit the area asap!

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

I headed through Holland park to Kensington High Street and passed the magnificent Bristol cars showroom. I love these old cars and I was surprised to learn that they still make hand-built cars.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

From here I joined the Old Brompton Road and came to my first point of personal interest – The place of my birth! I was born in the Princess Beatrice Hospital during a short time it had maternity wards. Fun fact – it was the hospital used as a location for the film ‘An American Werewolf in London‘. Luckily a film I adore!pbh_2

I passed through Hammersmith and made my way as quickly as possible to the Thames. I knew there would be a few dreary streets today so I fancied a nice river walk.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Not wanting to go too far out of my way I cut off a big loop of the river and headed across Chiswick. I’m fairly sure this is a bit of London I’ve never been to before. Nice.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

I joined the river again but it was at this point that I encountered some light rain. Did I mention that I’d not brought any waterproofs? I dived into a nice coffee place hoping it was just a short shower.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Braving the misty rain I carried on and before long I arrived in Brentford. I never actually lived here but I did work here briefly and for some reason even I cannot fathom Brentford F.C. have been the club that I’ve supported.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Getting over the minor nostalgia, I trudged up the couple of miles of Boston Manor Road. It was still raining and I was pretty wet by now.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

I got into Hanwell in time for a late lunch. I lived here for four years in the early 90s, the first place after I left home. Back then it seemed pretty run-down and awful. The upside was that it was incredibly cheap (£165.00 per month). Now the place has gone two or three rungs more upmarket with some independent coffee shops.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

After a superb (hipster) lunch of avocado on toast I was on my way again. My route now was very direct – straight up the Uxbridge Road all the way to Uxbridge. I drove or took the bus on this route hundreds of times but this would be my first walking it. It isn’t pretty.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Past the monolithic Ealing Hospital (not in Ealing?) it was a long line of suburban housing before entering Southall.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

It was here that the light rain showers turned in to a torrential downpour and when I got properly wet. I put on a brave face. Not long after Southall, the rain stopped and I made it over the boarder into my final London Borough – Hillingdon.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

I would love to tell you about the amazing views and beautiful things that I saw on my way into Uxbridge but I’m afraid that there wasn’t any.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

When I used to work here RAF Uxbridge was a busy military base that now rather sadly seems to have made way for uniform suburban housing. Uxbridge itself seemed pretty much the same.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

One thing certainly had changed since ‘my day’ which was the court house that I had spent my first seven years of employment had moved and the building had been demolished to make way for flats. It is interesting to note that this spot was once the turning point for trams that ran the whole length of the Uxbridge Road.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

From here it was just a few hundred meters to the border of Buckinghamshire (and the village of Denham). I had done it – a walk across the whole of London in 3 days. I’ll gloss over the five year gap between the first two and this one.

Walking across Greater London - Part 3

I feel this was a pretty cool thing to do and I’m really glad that I did it. Walking a city is definitely a brilliant thing to do if you have the time and ability.

I might have to do London – North to South. I reckon that is a two day adventure!

All the photos from the day are on Flickr.

Microadventure: Happy Valley

This is almost pure microadventuring for me: arrive late and leave very early. It was a campout organised by Laura M on behalf of the YesTribe. I put the kids to bed and by the time i got in the south croydon area that ‘happy valley’ is in it was already dark.

Happy valley camp

From the bus stop I had to make my way down some dark paths, through a remote car park (please god let this not be dogging night) and finally into the valley itself. For some reason I thought it would be fun to try and not use a torch (there was a little moonlight). Fifteen minutes of stumbling later I found the spot we’d agreed on but where was everyone? Was that a feint light of a head-torch through the trees? I crept through (ahem, crashed through) the undergrowth till I found my buddies. I was ‘home’.

We sat round in almost a circle, ate cake, biscuits and crisps and told a few stories by torchlight. I love this!

It had rained earlier so the ground was a bit damp and teeming with beetles and other creepy crawlies. In the night I was viciously mauled by a couple of slugs. By which I mean they crawled (or fell) on me and i picked them off.

Campout at dawn

We got up, packed up and were on our way more or less at first light. And what wonderful light!

Sunrise on one side, noon on the other. Perfect.

Fab morning after a lovely campout in Happy Valley

The walk back to Coulsden station over Farthing down was fantastic. This makes it all worthwhile.

This was my 13th campout as part of my #16in16  project. Not many to go now….

Microadventure: Hadleigh Castle 2016

Nearly (but not quite) a year since my first ever bivvy under the stars I found myself back at the wonderful Hadleigh Castle with a mostly new bunch of YesTribers.

Hadleigh Castle 2016

It is amazing how much has changed in the last year. I certainly remember how nervous I was last time, both of meeting a new set of people but also of sleeping out, exposed to the elements and to potential ne’er-do-wells. Now I feel a relatively seasoned microadventurer or at least experienced enough to be giving advice, lending gear and, of course, leading my own campouts.

#microadventure in a castle!

It was a nice change though to not be leading this one and I could take it easy a bit and just enjoy it. The weather looked quite threatening for most of the evening but apart from a few drops we were pretty lucky and it stayed dry.

Hadleigh Castle 2016

Hadleigh Castle 2016

Hadleigh Castle 2016

I even managed to meet up with my friend Sophia, who lives in Leigh over a wonderful breakfast.

Love this place and I’m sure i’ll be coming back again soon. This was my 12th campout of the year as part of my #16in16 project. Only four to go!

Microadventure: SUP the River Cam

It is good every now and again to try something new. If it also scares you a bit all the better right? Well on that slightly iffy principle I signed up to have a go at Stand Up Paddle-boarding (SUP). The sensible thing would have been to have had a few lessons and then planned an adventure. I skipped phase one of that plan and went straight for an expedition.

SUP the Cam

My friend Fiona had already completed the first two parts of her ‘Cam Triathlon’ project (walk and cycle the River Cam) and the SUP was the third and final leg. It was all a bit of a major faff on the logistics side but Fiona managed to organise the hire of some boards and was kind enough to give me a lift there too.

SUP the Cam

So there I was, without any training and only some useful hints from my friends, pushing the board out into the river and I was away. I have to confess that it all felt fairly wobbly and unstable and I was well out of my comfort zone. I did what I often do in these situations and do my best to fake confidence and competence as best I can. Not sure it particularly worked but you have to try!

SUP the Cam

We ambled along on a gorgeous day with loads of people out by the riverbank enjoying the sunshine and opportunity to swim, punt or kayak. I found going at a gentle pace on a calm river to be fairly ok. The excitement levels rose the nearer to Cambridge we got as the number of boats became quite an issue. It was a lot like dodgems and in its own way, quite exciting! So exciting that at one point I fell in. I can’t even blame anyone else, I just lost my balance. If you are going to get a soaking I do recommend that it is on a really hot day when it feels quite refreshing.

SUP the Cam

After we were through Cambridge it dawned on me that we’d really not gone that far and we needed to get down to some hard paddling! This is where I found that pootling along was fun but clocking up the miles was distinctly tougher. I never really got the hang of going in much of a straight line, it was essentially veer one way for a few strokes, change hands on the paddle and veer back again.

We were in the very interesting position of having more people than boards so when we got to the 10 mile mark I was a bit relieved to have someone take over my board for the last bit.

SUP the Cam

Tired but very happy we bivvy’d by the river in the grounds of a pub. This was my 11th campout of 2016 as part of my #16in16 project.

Clearly it was a bit ambitious to sign up to two days of paddle boarding with absolutely no experience or any training. I am a bit disappointed with myself, however, that I didn’t push it a bit more though. On the positive side, I did manage to paddle ten miles which can’t be too bad?

Would I try Stand-up Paddleboarding again? Probably, though it would be good to get some actual lessons on technique. On balance (literally) I think I’m a lot more in favour of kayaking. It seems more efficient and stable a way to travel on water. Time will tell.

SUP the Cam